.
English Monarchs
Scottish Monarchs


Saxon
Viking
Norman
Plantagenet
Lancaster
York
Tudor
Stuart
Hanover
Saxe-Coburg-Gotha
Windsor
Genealogical Tables


The Celts
The Brythonic Celts
Celtic Tribes
Brythonic Languages
Celtic Religion
Lindow Man
Iron Age Hillforts
Maiden Castle
Cassivellaunus
Commius
Cunobeline
The Roman
Conquest

Caractacus
The Battle of
Caer Caradoc

Cartimandua
The Last Stand of
the Druids

Boudicca
Battle of Watling
Street

Roman Britain
Roman Verulamium
St. Alban
Hadrian's Wall
Vortigern
Ambrosius
Aurelianus

Uther Pendragon
King Arthur
The Battle of
Mount Badon

Coel Hen
Rheged
Urien of Rheged
Owain of Rheged
The kingdom
of Dumnonia



Native Princes
Of Wales

English Princes
of Wales

The Honours of Wales

Medieval
Tudor Era
Stuart Era
Recent History


The Regalia
The Theft Of The Crown Jewels



Leeds Castle
Buckingham Palace
Windsor Castle
Holyrood House
Balmoral Castle
Sandringham House
Hampton Court Palace
Osborne House

St. George's Chapel
Westminster Abbey
Henry VII Chapel
Edward the
Confessor's Shrine






The Celts

The Celts arrived in Britain during a large migration of people from Europe westwards during the early Iron Age. A nation of fierce warriors, the tibes of the Brythonic Celts inhabited England, Wales and lowland Scotland during the Roman era and the post-Roman era. Their Religious practices revolved around offerings and sacrifices, sometimes human but more often involving the ritual slaughter of animals or the deposition of metalwork, especially war booty.

The Celts of England spoke a language known as Brythonic Celtic which developed from Proto-Celtic, which was to evolve into modern Welsh in Wales and Cumbric in the Hen Ogledd or "Old North" of Britain, Cornish in Cornwall and Breton in Gaul.

The Roman Emperor Claudius invaded Britain in 43 AD and encountered resistance from the Celts under the leadership of Caractacus, king of the Catuvellauni tribe and later by Boudica, Queen of the Icceni of Norfolk.

On the departure of the Roman legions and the arrival of the Anglo-Saxons under the brothers Hengist and Horsa in the fifth century, many of the Brythonic Celtic people were either absorbed into Anglo-Saxon culture, becoming "English"; some retreated to the Celtic enclaves of Wales, Cornwall and southern Scotland, while some emigrated to Brittany. Celtic resistance to the invaders had collapsed by 580, the Welsh monk Gildas relates "the groans of the Britons" , "The barbarians" he states, "drove them to the sea and the sea drove them back to the barbarians."


The Brythonic Celtic
People
The Celtic Tribes Iron Age Hillforts Maiden Castle
The Brythonic Celtic
Language

The Religion of
the Celts

Lindow Man Cassivellaunus
Commius Cunobeline The Roman Conquest
of Britain
Caractacus
The Battle of
Caer Caradoc

Cartimandua, Queen
of the Brigantes
The Last Stand of
the Druids
Boudicca,
Queen of the Icceni
Battle of
Watling Street
Roman Britain Roman Verulamium St. Alban
Hadrian's Wall Vortigern Ambrosius Aurelianus Uther Pendragon
King Arthur The Battle of
Mount Badon
Coel Hen The Kingdom of
Rheged
Urien Rheged Owain of Rheged The Kingdom of Dumnonia





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